Early Success Book | Derek Voigt | violin viola cello method

Early Success

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See: derekvoigt.com for more information

 

 

D.M.A. Candidate, University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music

M.M., University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music

B.M., Ithaca College School of Music

 

Author of the works: “Playing the Violin: A Pedagogical Analysis of Violin Technique and Performance Practice,” the Comprehensive String Series: “Early Success,” and the forthcoming work “Rememberization,” Derek Voigt is an internationally acclaimed violinist and pedagogue. He is currently the Director of the String Music Department at Chatfield College near Cincinnati, Ohio. An experienced performer, Derek performs frequently in solo recitals, including performances in Paris, France, Alba and Barolo, Italy, a unique solo performance in the New York City Italian Consulate with an Italian Chamber Orchestra produced by the United Nations, and performances in several other locations throughout the US.

 

Derek has taught a master class at Bowling Green State University, and is scheduled to teach a master class in New York State. He has performed in master classes with Christopher Hogwood, Charles Castleman, Elmar Oliveira, and Janet Sung. He began his violin studies at age 3, studying with Dmitry Gerikh. He studied Violin Performance at the Ithaca College School of Music with Susan Waterbury, and at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) with Dr. Piotr Milewski and Kurt Sassmannshaus. Derek is currently a Doctor of Musical Arts Candidate at CCM. When not performing solo repertoire, Derek can be found performing chamber and orchestral repertoire.

 

Derek has performed with professional orchestras and opera companies such as the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, the Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes, the Northern Tier Symphony Orchestra, where he served as the orchestra's Concertmaster, and the Cincinnati Chamber Opera, where he served as Principal Second Violin. Derek has served as concertmaster for numerous other ensembles, including the Grassroots Festival Chamber Orchestra in Ithaca, New York, the Voices Multi-Cultural Chorus’ Orchestra, and the New Violin Family Orchestra.

 

An Early Music enthusiast, Derek has played Baroque Violin in Cornell University's Early Music Ensemble, Les Petits Violons. In this ensemble, he worked closely with great musicians like Neal Zaslaw and Christopher Hogwood. He currently owns an unconverted violin made in the early 1700’s. Derek is also interested in 'new' instruments. He has played Soprano Violin in the New Violin Family Orchestra. This instrument is smaller than a typical Violin and is tuned a fourth higher (C-G-D-A). It can be thought of as an octave above a viola. It produces a very unique sound and allows for some very high notes. Derek also owns a unique Piccolo Violin. This instrument is tuned an octave higher a traditional violin (G-D-A-E). This instrument can be used to perform traditional violin repertoire at a very high pitch.

 

In 2010, Derek became the Founding Executive Director of the Tompkins County Youth Orchestra in Ithaca, NY. Since Derek's departure from Ithaca, the group has changed to become the Ithaca Youth Orchestra.

 

In 2008, Derek founded the 501-(c)(3) Non-Profit Organization, The Violin Player. The organization advances music education by providing quality musical instruments, as well as other educational resources, to schools and individuals in Ohio and New York. Please see: www.TheViolinPlayer.org

Teaching Tips/Edits

General Comments:

Dynamics: Most of the pieces do not include dynamic suggestions. This omission is intentional, as it should be up to the student and teacher to determine what works best. Teachers should offer suggestions but allow the student to have an opinion. This helps the student discover his/her personal musical taste.

Tempo: Most of the pieces do not include tempo suggestions. This omission is intentional, as it should be up to the student and teacher to determine what works best. I like to think that the tempo of a piece is determined by a couple factors: one practical and one emotional. Practically, it is determined by the student's ability to play the fastest section of the piece. Pick a tempo at which this section can be performed with ease and perform the entire piece at this speed. Emotionally, tempo should follow some sort of living beat. Some examples include: heart beat, walking pace, running pace, and breathing, though there are many others. Music will sound different at various tempos, so determine what the appropriate mood for the piece is and then decide what tempo best portrays this mood.

Performance Practice: The pieces that are in historical forms (like the minuets) should be performed with the appropriate elements of performance practice. Generally, each measure should contain a strong - weak feeling , though larger phrases, such as sections of a sentence or period, can also contain large-scale strong - weak gestures. Please contact the author with questions.

 

Violin:

59. Add an apostrophe (Retake) at the end of line 2

60. Add an apostrophe (Retake) at the end of line 1

63. Add an apostrophe (Retake) at the end of line 1

64. "Secret Agent" is composed by Derek J. Voigt

74. Allow the student to be creative and add dynamics to make the piece more interesting. Since the piece is in the form AABA, students can choose to make each A section the same or different, depending on their own unique musical taste. I like to allow the dynamic level to follow the contour of the notes in the B section, with a crescendo to the high G, and then a diminuendo to the end of the line.

89. I do not recommend playing the music at the bottom of the page on the violin. Rather, do one of the following: clap the rhythm, count out loud, use rhythm solfege, speak a word whose syllables match the rhythm, or use another method to help demonstrate the rhythm. The music was included to help show the student what dotted quarter notes followed by eighth notes looks like.

 

Viola:

60. Add an apostrophe (Retake) at the end of line 1

63. Add an apostrophe (Retake) at the end of line 1

78. Allow the student to be creative and add dynamics to make the piece more interesting. Since the piece is in the form AABA, students can choose to make each A section the same or different, depending on their own unique musical taste. I like to allow the dynamic level to follow the contour of the notes in the B section, with a crescendo to the high G, and then a diminuendo to the end of the line.

93. I do not recommend playing the music at the bottom of the page on the viola. Rather, do one of the following: clap the rhythm, count out loud, use rhythm solfege, speak a word whose syllables match the rhythm, or use another method to help demonstrate the rhythm. The music was included to help show the student what dotted quarter notes followed by eighth notes looks like.

 

Cello:

76. Allow the student to be creative and add dynamics to make the piece more interesting. Since the piece is in the form AABA, students can choose to make each A section the same or different, depending on their own unique musical taste. I like to allow the dynamic level to follow the contour of the notes in the B section, with a crescendo to the high G, and then a diminuendo to the end of the line.

81. A basic form of shifting can be taught with this piece. Though it wouldn't be inappropriate to give a student simple shifting exercises to practice, I recommend waiting until after they complete the book to give them this type of material. The shifting opportunities in this piece are present in measures 5-6, 13-14, and 21-22. The fourth note of each first measure is an open string. In the first and last example, the open string is G, and in the second example, the open string is D. During these open strings, shift the left hand so that the second finger lands on the next note. Simply tell the student that the second finger goes where the fourth finger normally does. The note after this will be played with the fourth finger. Following the fourth finger, shift back down so that the low 2 is played in first position. Though introducing shifting early is useful, this piece can also be played entirely in first position. Shifting, however, makes the piece easier, as the right hand otherwise has big leaps across 2 strings.

91. I do not recommend playing the music at the bottom of the page on the cello. Rather, do one of the following: clap the rhythm, count out loud, use rhythm solfege, speak a word whose syllables match the rhythm, or use another method to help demonstrate the rhythm. The music was included to help show the student what dotted quarter notes followed by eighth notes looks like.

111-115. This concerto is totally playable in one position. That being said, I like to add shifts when appropriate in order to keep the concept fresh in the student's mind. One example of a great place to add a simple shift is at the end of measure 32. During the last open D, shift so that first finger replaces fourth finger on the next note "C." Shifting back down might be a little more awkward for the student, but they can shift right back down from C to B (fingers 1 to 3).

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